Stress strain relationship diagram for teens

Stress Strain Curve – Relationship, Diagram and Explanation - Mechanical Booster

stress strain relationship diagram for teens

Plotting the values of stress versus the corresponding values of strain results in the The figure below shows the typical stress-strain diagram for carbon steel in . Typical stress-strain curves under compression: red curve, teenage dentin; blue curve, mature dentin. Compression strength of teenage dentin is less on about. The bones of kids and young teens are smaller than those of adults and .. part of the body, resulting in inflammation (pain and swelling), muscle strain, or tissue damage. This stress generally is from repeating the same movements over and over (pronounced: sko-lee-OH-sus), which causes the spine to curve too much.

The soft bone marrow inside many of our bones is where most of the blood cells flowing through our bodies are made. The bone marrow contains stem cells, which produce the body's red blood cells and platelets, and some types of white blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen to the body's tissues, and platelets help with blood clotting when someone has a cut or wound.

White blood cells help the body fight infection. Bones are made up of two types of material — compact bone and cancellous bone.

Compact bone is the solid, hard outside part of the bone. This type of bone makes up most of the human skeleton. It looks like ivory and is extremely strong. Holes and channels run through it, carrying blood vessels and nerves from the periosteum, the bone's outer membrane.

KAN-suh-lus bone, which looks like a sponge, is inside the compact bone. It is made up of a mesh-like network of tiny pieces of bone called trabeculae pronounced: This is where red and white blood cells are formed in the marrow. Bones are fastened to other bones by long, fibrous straps called ligaments pronounced: KAR-tul-ija flexible, rubbery substance in our joints, supports bones and protects them where they rub against each other.

Bones don't work alone — they need help from the muscles and joints. Muscles pull on the joints, allowing us to move. They also help the body perform other functions so we can grow and remain strong, such as chewing food and then moving it through the digestive system. The human body has more than muscles. They are connected to bones by tough, cord-like tissues called tendons, which allow the muscles to pull on bones. If you wiggle your fingers, you can see the tendons on the back of your hand move as they do their work.

Humans have three different kinds of muscle: Skeletal muscle is attached to bone, mostly in the legs, arms, abdomen, chest, neck, and face. Skeletal muscles are called striated pronounced: STRY-ay-ted because they are made up of fibers that have horizontal stripes when viewed under a microscope. These muscles hold the skeleton together, give the body shape, and help it with everyday movements they are known as voluntary muscles because you can control their movement.

They can contract shorten or tighten quickly and powerfully, but they tire easily and have to rest between workouts. Smooth, or involuntary, muscle is also made of fibers, but this type of muscle looks smooth, not striated. Generally, we can't consciously control our smooth muscles; rather, they're controlled by the nervous system automatically which is why they are also called involuntary.

Examples of smooth muscles are the walls of the stomach and intestines, which help break up food and move it through the digestive system. Smooth muscle is also found in the walls of blood vessels, where it squeezes the stream of blood flowing through the vessels to help maintain blood pressure. Smooth muscles take longer to contract than skeletal muscles do, but they can stay contracted for a long time because they don't tire easily.

KAR-dee-ak muscle is found in the heart. The walls of the heart's chambers are composed almost entirely of muscle fibers.

Stress-Strain Relationship::Fundamentals::Knowledgebase::SAFAS

Cardiac muscle is also an involuntary type of muscle. Its rhythmic, powerful contractions force blood out of the heart as it beats. Muscles and Movement Even when you sit perfectly still, there are muscles throughout your body that are constantly moving. Muscles enable your heart to beat, your chest to rise and fall as you breathe, and your blood vessels to help regulate the pressure and flow of blood through your body.

When we smile and talk, muscles are helping us communicate, and when we exercise, they help us stay physically fit and healthy. The movements your muscles make are coordinated and controlled by the brain and nervous system. The involuntary muscles are controlled by structures deep within the brain and the upper part of the spinal cord called the brain stem.

The voluntary muscles are regulated by the parts of the brain known as the cerebral motor cortex and the cerebellum.

When you decide to move, the motor cortex sends an electrical signal through the spinal cord and peripheral nerves to the muscles, causing them to contract. The motor cortex on the right side of the brain controls the muscles on the left side of the body and vice versa. Sensors in the muscles and joints send messages back through peripheral nerves to tell the cerebellum and other parts of the brain where and how the arm or leg is moving and what position it's in.

This feedback results in smooth, coordinated motion. If you want to lift your arm, your brain sends a message to the muscles in your arm and you move it. When you run, the messages to the brain are more involved, because many muscles have to work in rhythm. Muscles move body parts by contracting and then relaxing. Your muscles can pull bones, but they can't push them back to their original position. So they work in pairs of flexors and extensors. The flexor contracts to bend a limb at a joint.

Then, when you've completed the movement, the flexor relaxes and the extensor contracts to extend or straighten the limb at the same joint: For example, the biceps muscle, in the front of the upper arm, is a flexor, and the triceps, at the back of the upper arm, is an extensor.

stress strain relationship diagram for teens

When you bend at your elbow, the biceps contracts. Then the biceps relaxes and the triceps contracts to straighten the elbow. Joints allow our bodies to move in many ways. Some joints open and close like a hinge such as knees and elbowswhereas others allow for more complicated movement — a shoulder or hip joint, for example, allows for backward, forward, sideways, and rotating movement.

Joints are classified by their range of movement.

stress strain relationship diagram for teens

Immovable, or fibrous, joints don't move. The dome of the skull, for example, is made of bony plates, which must be immovable to protect the brain. Between the edges of these plates are links, or joints, of fibrous tissue. Fibrous joints also hold the teeth in the jawbone. Partially movable, or cartilaginous pronounced: They are linked by cartilage, as in the spine. Each of the vertebrae in the spine moves in relation to the one above and below it, and together these movements give the spine its flexibility.

Freely movable, or synovial pronounced: The main joints of the body — found at the hip, shoulders, elbows, knees, wrists, and ankles — are freely movable.

Bones, Muscles, and Joints

They are filled with synovial fluid, which acts as a lubricant to help the joints move easily. Beyond this point, work hardening commences. The appearance of the yield point is associated with pinning of dislocations in the system. Specifically, solid solution interacts with dislocations and acts as pin and prevent dislocation from moving. Therefore, the stress needed to initiate the movement will be large.

As long as the dislocation escape from the pinning, stress needed to continue it is less. After the yield point, the curve typically decreases slightly because of dislocations escaping from Cottrell atmospheres. As deformation continues, the stress increases on account of strain hardening until it reaches the ultimate tensile stress.

Until this point, the cross-sectional area decreases uniformly and randomly because of Poisson contractions. The actual fracture point is in the same vertical line as the visual fracture point. However, beyond this point a neck forms where the local cross-sectional area becomes significantly smaller than the original. If the specimen is subjected to progressively increasing tensile force it reaches the ultimate tensile stress and then necking and elongation occur rapidly until fracture.

If the specimen is subjected to progressively increasing length it is possible to observe the progressive necking and elongation, and to measure the decreasing tensile force in the specimen. The appearance of necking in ductile materials is associated with geometrical instability in the system. Due to the natural inhomogeneity of the material, it is common to find some regions with small inclusions or porosity within it or surface, where strain will concentrate, leading to a locally smaller area than other regions.

For strain less than the ultimate tensile strain, the increase of work-hardening rate in this region will be greater than the area reduction rate, thereby make this region harder to be further deform than others, so that the instability will be removed, i.

However, as the strain become larger, the work hardening rate will decreases, so that for now the region with smaller area is weaker than other region, therefore reduction in area will concentrate in this region and the neck becomes more and more pronounced until fracture.

After the neck has formed in the materials, further plastic deformation is concentrated in the neck while the remainder of the material undergoes elastic contraction owing to the decrease in tensile force.